Making WINE at Home


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Step 1: Legality and Warning

However, for those who have decided to use actual fruit, you now need to wash the fruit. This is an important step, as it will help eliminate any wild yeast from growing in your wine and producing foul smells and flavours. Some more experienced winemakers decide not to wash the fruit, but we recommend that as beginner winemakers, you go about controlling as many variables as possible, and go ahead washing your fruit. You want to fill the plastic container to roughly 1. Now, you can add your Campden tablet to your large container of fruit juice which will release sulphur dioxide into the liquid, killing off any wild yeast and bacteria.

Now before letting the wine ferment, you need to use the hydrometer.

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Generally, if it reads less than around 1. Finally, around day 4, when the mixture is not bubbling as much, you can begin straining the liquid and syphoning it into the 3 carboys for long-term storage. The reason for this is because the container will now have sediment from the initial fermentation process, so we want to separate this from the liquid.

How to Make Homemade Wine Stronger

Generally, if it reads less than around 1. Finally, around day 4, when the mixture is not bubbling as much, you can begin straining the liquid and syphoning it into the 3 carboys for long-term storage. The reason for this is because the container will now have sediment from the initial fermentation process, so we want to separate this from the liquid.

Once you have syphoned all of the liquid into the three carboys or however many you have , you can now attach the airlocks to the carboys. The airlocks will allow for gas to be released during the on-going fermentation process whilst preventing oxygen for entering the carboys meaning the wine is not oxygenized and thus not spoiled. Generally, this is where experience will play a large part in enabling you to know how long to leave the wine.

The liquid in the carboys should look clearer as the sediment begins to fall to the bottom. This means that the wine is suitable for syphoning into your clean bottles, where you can fill them to the top and cork them immediately, to help the wine maintain its freshness and prevent oxygenization. Remember, dark bottles will preserve the colour of red wines. This is a very simple nutrient which will guarantee a strong fermentation and reduce the risk of the production of hydrogen sulphide rotten egg gas.

Use at the rate 1 gram per 5 litres of must. Add at the time of pitching yeast. The wine will start to ferment and should be allowed to progress on the skins for 4 to 14 days, depending on the style you want to make. Fuller-flavoured darker wines will require the maximum amount of time on the skins, whereas lighter styles will need only the minimum amount of time.

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To ensure proper skin contact you will need to plunge the grapes several times a day. This is simply a matter of pushing the skins under the surface of the wine to ensure that maximum contact occurs between the skins and the juice. Pour or scoop the wine and skins into the press once it is assembled. Be sure to have some method of collecting the wine as the juice will start to flow out of the press straight away. Several 10 litre buckets are ideal. Once the press is filled with the grape skins you can start to press the wine.

This is a fairly straightforward procedure.

Homemade Italian Wine

The only important thing to say about this is not to over-press the skins. This will achieve very little in the way of additional juice, but will extract excessive amounts of harsh tannins from the grapes. The best quality wine is made from the free-flowing juice that is the first to flow from the press. The next step is to transfer the pressings into a suitable fermenter to allow the completion of the fermentation.

We use and recommend the use of suitable size glass demijohns, stainless steel kegs with the wine held under carbon dioxide or variable capacity tanks. Demijohns range in size from 5 to 54, litres with several sizes in between. Try to transfer the wine from container to demijohn as gently as possible to avoid contact with too much air. Once in the demijohn fit a rubber bung and airlock to make sure the wine is protected while the fermentation is completed.

Fermentation is complete when a hydrometer reading of below -1 Baume or to Specific Gravity, is achieved. Racking, or transferring the wine, is the next step towards the finished wine. This is simply the procedure of moving the wine from one container to another, to allow the yeast to settle out, so the finished wine will be clear and sediment free.

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Winemaking

Syphon, or drain the wine, via a syphon hose from the first demijohn to another one of exactly the same size. Do this as gently as possible, again to avoid oxidation. Stainless steel kegs used in conjunction with carbon dioxide are another excellent storage vessel, as are stainless steel variable capacity tanks.

New oak barrels are also excellent storage vessels, although once again, they should be kept full at all times. Old oak barrels, especially ones which were originally used for whiskey or bourbon, are not recommended. Wineries generally only use their barrels and these are new ones for 3 to 4 years and keep them full at all times.

Add 1 gram of potassium metabisulphite for each 10 litres of wine just prior to racking as an anti-oxidant. Use 4 grams per 10 litres. Mix bentonite well with 50 ml of water 12 hours before use. Add to the wine and stir gently to distribute evenly.

Again add 1 gram of potassium metabisulphite for each 10 litres of wine just prior to racking as an anti-oxidant. Simply fill into cleaned and sterilised bottles of your choice, taking care to minimize splashing and leaving any sediment in the demijohn. Now comes the hard part, waiting for it to mature. This will usually take between 6 - 9 months as a minimum, and is at its best from 18 months to 4 years. Oak is an important contributor to the flavour and aroma of most commercial red wines, however good oak barrels are very expensive and there are difficulties in using them.

A more reasonably priced alternative is to use oak chips. The best flavour is achieved by using them during primary fermentation.

Making WINE at Home Making WINE at Home
Making WINE at Home Making WINE at Home
Making WINE at Home Making WINE at Home
Making WINE at Home Making WINE at Home
Making WINE at Home Making WINE at Home
Making WINE at Home Making WINE at Home
Making WINE at Home Making WINE at Home
Making WINE at Home Making WINE at Home

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